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Keynote-Speaker

Richard Bartle

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Sunday, 14 December 2008 22:42

Richard Bartle

Dr. Richard Allan Bartle is a British writer and game researcher, best known for  being the co-author of MUD, the first multi-user dungeon. He is one of the  pioneers of the massively multiplayer online game industry. Bartle received a PhD in artificial intelligence from the University of Essex, which is where he created MUD along with Roy Trubshaw, in 1978. He lectured at Essex until 1987, when he left to work full time on MUD (known as MUD2 in its present version). Recently he has returned to the university as a part-time professor and teaching fellow in the Department of Electronic Systems Engineering, supervising courses in computer game design as part of the department’s degree course on computer game development. In 2003, he wrote Designing Virtual Worlds, a well-received book about the history, ethics, and “nuts and bolts” of massively multiplayer games. Bartle is also a contributing editor to Terra Nova, an influential collaborative blog that deals with virtual world issues.
He is currently a Visiting Professor, Department of Electronic Systems Engineering, Essex University.

Abstract:

MMO Morality

When people sign up to play a game, they have broad expectations as to what will be involved in terms of time commitment, gameplay, skill requirements, genre and atmosphere.

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Christoph Klimmt

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Sunday, 14 December 2008 22:19

Christoph Klimmt

Dr. Christoph Klimmt is Juniorprofessor for Journalism with main focus on Online Communication at the Institute of Journalism and Communication Studies of the Johannes-Gutenberg-University Mainz. He was stand-in for the C3-Professorship Media Studies of Peter Vorderer. Christoph Klimmt is member of the International Communication Association (ICA), of the DG PuK (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Publizistik- und Kommunikations-forschung) as well as the Digital Games Research Association (DIGRA). He has written numerous publications on the topic of games.

Abstract:

The Challenge of Measuring the Use of Computer Games

The remarkable rise of research on computer games across many academic disciplines and fields is mainly motivated by the fact – or the assumption – that the use of computer games has reached a level of societal or at least scientific relevance.

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Tanya Krzywinska

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Sunday, 14 December 2008 22:24

Tanya Krzywinska

Dr. Tanya Krzywinska is a Professor in Screen Studies at the Brunel University West London. She has a BA (hons) in European Literature and Film and Drama (Reading), an MA in Modern Drama (University of North London), and a PhD in Economics of Fantasy and Desire in Explicit Sex films (University of North London). She is President of the Digital Games Research Association (DIGRA) and has published widely on different aspects of videogames. She is currently focusing her attention on game media, in particularly in relation to massively multiplayer online games and transmedial fantasy franchises.

Abstract:

The strange case of the disappearance of sex in video games

The strange case of the disappearance of sex in video games. It’s common for news media to relish stories about sex in games in order to generate the attractions of salacious capital. The Grand Theft Auto franchise has been particularly good at soliciting such interest and making their own capital from the lure of sexual transgression.  But despite the lurid copy, there has in fact been very little explicit sex in video games. This paper analyses why this is the case.

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Eric Klopfer

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Sunday, 14 December 2008 23:09

Eric Klopfer

Dr. Eric Klopfer is Associate Professor of Education at MIT, Director of MIT’s Scheller Teacher Education Program (TEP), with a joint appointment at the MIT Media Lab. Eric Klopfer’s research focuses on the development and use of computer games and simulations for building understanding of science and complex systems. His research explores simulations and games on desktop computers as well as handhelds. He currently runs the StarLogo project, a desktop platform that enables students and teachers to create computer simulations of complex systems. He is also the creator of StarLogo TNG, a new platform for helping kids create 3D simulations and games using a graphical
programming language. Klopfer’s work combines the construction of new software tools with research and development of new pedagogical supports that support the use of these tools in the classroom.

Abstract:

Simulations, Games and the Next Generation of Learning.

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Michael Nitsche

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Sunday, 14 December 2008 23:28

Michael Nitsche

Dr. Michael Nitsche works as an Assistant Professor at the School of Literature, Communication & Culture (LCC) at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He teaches courses mainly for the Digital Media Masters and PhDs, as well as for the Computational Media program. Nitsche is Founder and Director of the Digital World & Image Group (DWIG) and he is Co-chair of the DiGRA Special Interest Group on 'Games and Film' (with Diane Carr). Furthermore Michael Nitsche is Associated Director of the Experimental Game Lab. His research interests focuses on the design, use and production of virtual spaces, Machinima, and the borderlines between games, film and performance. Michael’s work is acombination of practical experiments and theoretical exploration. He has published on the use of cinematic language, performance, and spatial design of virtual worlds and related issues of games research.

Abstract:

Growing Game Worlds

This talk will draw a line from the earliest game worlds to recent forms of game spaces. During their impressive evolution, these game worlds have incorporated multiple other media formats including literature, architecture and film.

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